FREE EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS FROM THE BEEF CHECKOFF, A PROGRAM SUPPORTED BY BEEF FARMERS AND RANCHERS

We’re excited to announce a FREE educational experience for your patients about the importance of introducing iron-rich complementary foods to infants.

In the U.S., one in five infants under 1 year of age are failing to meet iron requirements.1

Iron intakes among older infants and young children have been declining since 2002, in part, because of low consumption of iron-rich foods.2 Furthermore, iron requirements increase substantially starting around 6 months of age and throughout these early years which are marked by tremendous physical and cognitive growth and development.3

Iron – along with zinc and choline – is essential to support healthy growth and development in the early years, particularly among infants who are exclusively breastfed and ready to transition to complementary feeding. That’s why the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends introducing nutrient-dense foods, such as meat, during this transition, to help protect against deficiencies that can impact a child’s development, learning, behavior and growth.4

Later this summer, you will receive complimentary evidence-based educational materials on the importance of introducing iron-rich complementary foods, such as beef, to infants.

As always, everything is absolutely FREE with no obligation!

ForYourPatients provides FREE programs to healthcare professionals. To join our exclusive panel of professionals visit ForYourPatients.net. If you have any questions, or wish not to receive this program, please contact us at: info@foryourpatients.net or text/call us at 312-767-1820.

  1. A snapshot of the first 1000 days in America. https://thousanddays.org/resource/snapshot-first-1000-days-america/ Accessed April 6, 2021.
  2. Roess AA, Jacquier EF, Catellier DJ, Carvalho R, Lutes AC, Anater AS and Dietz WH. Food Consumption Patterns of Infants and Toddlers: Findings from the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS) 2016. J Nutr. 2018;148:1525S-1535S.
  3. Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium and Zinc. Washington D.C.: National Academy Press, 2001.
  4. Kleinman, RE, Greer, FR. Pediatric nutrition, 8th edition. American Academy of Pediatrics. 2019 November 15.
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